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Library Terminology: J-L

Discover the truth that lies behind the most Arcane Library vocabulary--- stranger than fiction!

Journal through Loan Period

J

Journal: Journals report original research, discoveries, experimentation, reviews, or essays, and  are written by and for scholars and researchers in the field. Often published by academic or association presses, journals are peer reviewed by an editor or specialists in the field for accuracy.

K

Keyword Searching: The actual word or phrase used to search for specific content. A type of search that looks for words in titles, contents notes, and abstracts. This is a useful search when your information is incomplete or uncertain. Different electronic systems call keyword searching by various names, such as "word" or "text searching."

L

Library of Congress Classification System: A classification system using letters and numbers to arrange books of the same topic together. Related to this, books and other materials in  Auraria Library are given subjects from the Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) list. You can search by Library of Congress Subject Headings within Skyline, Auraria Library's online catalog or click on a specific heading within an entry in Skyline to obtain more information. Also see Controlled Vocabulary.

Limits: Filters applied to the results of an electronic search. Publication year or dates, additional search terms, and the written text's language are some common limits.  

Loan Period: This term refers to the length of time library materials may be borrowed.

J is for Jefferson

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jefferson-peale.jpg  Thomas JeffersonThomas Jefferson

Jefferson sold his personal library of 6,487 volumes to the United States in 1815, thus doubling the size of the recently established Library of Congress. Critics objected not only to the cost ($23,950), but even more so in regard to many of his titles, which included works of an "irreligious, and immoral tendency." Jefferson also devised an organizational scheme which was initially used to catalog works at the library.

Source:  Downs, Robert B. A Dictionary of Eminent Librarians. Worland, WY; High Plains Publishing Co., Inc., 1990 (pg. 92)